1.Marijuana is not an appropriate substitute for opioids to relieve pain because research shows between 9 and 30 percent of users may develop some degree of marijuana use disorder, making some three times more likely to become addicted to heroin.
2.People addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to switch to heroin, which is cheaper, to continue their addiction

Marijuana

Not everyone who smokes marijuana will become addicted—that depends on a whole bunch of factors, including your genes, the age you start using, whether you also use other drugs, your relationships with family and friends, success in school, and so on. Repeated marijuana use can lead to addiction, which means that people have trouble controlling their drug use and often cannot stop even though they want to. Research shows that about 9 percent, or about 1 in 11, of those who use marijuana will become addicted.Marijuana is linked to school failure. Marijuana’s negative effects on attention, memory, and learning can last for days and sometimes weeks—especially if you use it often. Someone who smokes marijuana daily may have a "dimmed-down" brain most or all of the time. Compared with teens who don’t use, students who smoke marijuana tend to get lower grades and are more likely to drop out of high school.

A Letter to Teens

Did you know that teen marijuana use has dropped dramatically since the late 1990s? So, if you were thinking everyone smokes marijuana, they don’t. Statistics show that about 7 percent, or roughly 1 in 14 teens, report using marijuana in the past month. However, many teens do not consider marijuana to be a harmful drug. Some believe marijuana cannot be harmful because it is "natural." But not all natural plants are good for you—take tobacco, for example.

One serious risk is addiction. In 2013, around 4.2 million people 12 and older had a marijuana abuse or addiction proble  Marijuana is not as harmless as you may think. Look inside this booklet to find out more.

Our goal is to give you the straight facts so you can make smart choices and be your best self—without drugs. And we hope you will continue the conversation and share this information with your friends, parents, teachers, and others. 

Alcohol

Drinking by underage persons (ages 12 to 20) has declined. Current alcohol use by this age group declined from 28.8 to 22.7 percent between 2002 and 2013, while binge drinking declined from 19.3 to 14.2 percent and the rate of heavy drinking went from 6.2 to 3.7 percent.

Binge and heavy drinking are more widespread among men than women. In 2013, 30.2 percent of men and 16.0 percent of women 12 and older reported binge drinking in the past month. And 9.5 percent of men and 3.3 percent of women reported heavy alcohol use.

Driving under the influence of alcohol has also declined slightly. In 2013, an estimated 28.7 million people, or 10.9 percent of persons aged 12 or older, had driven under the influence of alcohol at least once in the past year, down from 14.2 percent in 2002. Although this decline is encouraging, any driving under the influence remains a cause for concern.